Expressions in Glass and Mortar The works of Ellen Rebarber and Eric Beckerich

“Illuminating Inspiration”   fused glass and copper wire,  by Ellen Rebarber

“Illuminating Inspiration” fused glass and copper wire, by Ellen Rebarber

“New Temple”  mortar, wood and found objects, by Eric Beckerich

“New Temple” mortar, wood and found objects, by Eric Beckerich

Ellen Rebarber   “Birches”   fused glass, by Ellen Rebarber

Ellen Rebarber “Birches” fused glass, by Ellen Rebarber

“Abstract 3” mortar and found objects,  by Eric Beckerich

“Abstract 3” mortar and found objects, by Eric Beckerich

“Winter Freeze”   fused glass and wood, by Ellen Rebarber

“Winter Freeze” fused glass and wood, by Ellen Rebarber

“At the Opening” mortar and found objects,  by Eric Beckerich

“At the Opening” mortar and found objects, by Eric Beckerich

“Don’t fence me in”   fused glass and copper wire and wood,  by Ellen Rebarber

“Don’t fence me in” fused glass and copper wire and wood, by Ellen Rebarber

“Three for One”   fused glass, brass rods and wood, by Ellen Rebarber

“Three for One” fused glass, brass rods and wood, by Ellen Rebarber

“Retrospective Totem”   stainless steel, ceramic, wood, copper, and glass  by Ellen Rebarber

“Retrospective Totem” stainless steel, ceramic, wood, copper, and glass by Ellen Rebarber

“Thoughts and Projections” mortar and found objects, bye Eric Beckerich

“Thoughts and Projections” mortar and found objects, bye Eric Beckerich

“In Time” mortar, wire, paper and found objects, by Eric Beckerich

“In Time” mortar, wire, paper and found objects, by Eric Beckerich

“Blues in the Night”   fused glass and wood, by Ellen Rebarber

“Blues in the Night” fused glass and wood, by Ellen Rebarber

“Turbulent Forest”   fused glass and wood by Ellen Rebarber

“Turbulent Forest” fused glass and wood by Ellen Rebarber

“Abstract Presence”  mortar, sticks, wire by Eric Beckerich

“Abstract Presence” mortar, sticks, wire by Eric Beckerich

“Architectural Expression” mortar and found objects,  by Eric Beckerich

“Architectural Expression” mortar and found objects, by Eric Beckerich

“3 Sisters” mortar and found objects, by Eric Beckerich

“3 Sisters” mortar and found objects, by Eric Beckerich

“River of Wonder”   fused glass in wood frame, by Ellen Rebarber

“River of Wonder” fused glass in wood frame, by Ellen Rebarber

“At the Artists Studio” mortar and found objects by Erick Beckerich

“At the Artists Studio” mortar and found objects by Erick Beckerich

“Sail Away”   fused glass and wood, by Ellen Rebarber

“Sail Away” fused glass and wood, by Ellen Rebarber

“Silent Sphinx”   ceramic by Ellen Rebarber

“Silent Sphinx” ceramic by Ellen Rebarber

“Guardian”  mortar, found objects on cinder blocks, by Eric Beckerich

“Guardian” mortar, found objects on cinder blocks, by Eric Beckerich

“Winged Victory”  mortar, copper, wood and found objects by Eric Beckerich

“Winged Victory” mortar, copper, wood and found objects by Eric Beckerich

“Blueness Abundant”   fused glass, by Ellen Rebarber

“Blueness Abundant” fused glass, by Ellen Rebarber

“The 25”  mortar, found objects by Eric Beckerich

“The 25” mortar, found objects by Eric Beckerich

“Hanging Abstract”  mortar, wire paper and found objects, – by Eric Beckerich

“Hanging Abstract” mortar, wire paper and found objects, – by Eric Beckerich

“Totem”  – ceramic, plaster, wood by Ellen Rebarber

“Totem” – ceramic, plaster, wood by Ellen Rebarber

“Fireball”   fused glass, copper and wood by Ellen Rebarber

“Fireball” fused glass, copper and wood by Ellen Rebarber

“Sticks” – mortar, sticks, found objects on marble, by Eric Beckerich

“Sticks” – mortar, sticks, found objects on marble, by Eric Beckerich

“Mosaic Moon” – fused glass by Ellen Rebarber

“Mosaic Moon” – fused glass by Ellen Rebarber

Ellen Rebarber is a sculptor. She works with a variety of materials including metal, wood, stone, cement, plaster, clay, and most recently glass. She welds, solders and enjoys making raku clay sculpture. Throughout her adult life, Ellen has taken classes to expand her knowledge in art. Ellen studied under George Segal, the sculptor, who made a profound impression on her work. She learned about form, texture, composition, painting, drawing, art and music. After her retirement from teaching in Highland Park, Ellen enrolled in college art classes at Mason Gross School of Visual Arts at Rutgers University, where she studied with Rudy Serra for sculpture and Peter Callas and Chris Bonner for ceramics. She continues to create new works, combining materials and pushing her limits to express her passion for art. Ellen’s work is in many private collections and she is available for commissions.
Statement

New and different work was my focus in preparing for this show. Considering the fact that over many years, I have accumulated a vast number of artistic endeavors, using many different mediums.  I always fall  in love with the material I am working with at the moment.

The combining of different media always excites me.

Working with glass over the past ten years has been a passion for me.  The color selection is extremely provocative!  I have frequent love affairs with  the many types of glass.  Dichroic glass makes my heart really beat quickly.  Patterned glass gives me a jolt and iridescent glass makes me tingle.  This results in my creative juices really flowing.

Included is a piece that I made some time ago.  It is ceramic, and at that time my love was clay.  I had the fortune to work large and use different types of firing techniques.  With the availability of electric and gas kilns, I was able to expand on  the methods of firing. This piece is an example of

Raku.

The Totem Pole is also new for me.  This large one is titled, “Retrospective Totem”.  Each of the components selected for this new sculpture represent an experience in a lifetime of exploring new materials. Every piece represents a form I love, and how it was used previously.

My goal for this piece was to create a new work of art to represent the ways I have worked in the past. The entire process was enjoyable. The weeks of decision making, planning and looking for balance and flow, putting in and removing, all the problem solving that goes into creating a new piece.  And Oh! What joy, when I put the final touches on and stepped back, all my

memories there!

    Hamilton Street Gallery is very proud to present the works of Ellen Rebarber and Eric Beckerich. Both artists produce amazing sculptures, utilizing silica based materials as their primary media, but with very different results. The radiant elegance of Ellen’s mixed media and fused glass pieces, juxtapose naturally with Eric’s massive and cube-like archaic constructions of mortar and found objects. Working with a variety of materials and processes has intrinsically connected both artists to the natural elements of fire, air, water and earth. Throughout the room are sculptures that honor the source from which they came.

My work incorporates elements of architecture, painting, drawing and sculpture. The pieces are at once ancient and modern. They can be arranged and rearranged, offering infinite compositional possibilities and experiences. Viewed individually, they resemble rare objects that beg to be explored and appreciated for their intriguing depth and complexity.

In 2007 I began creating small mortar and wood sculptures, which evolved with the addition of glass, metal, stone and small found objects. The size, intricacy and                intrigue have developed with each passing year. 

I graduated from Memphis State University with a BFA in Painting and Sculpture and worked for many years as a designer, creating custom displays, exhibits, and                        interiors and doing commissioned illustrations. My work has been exhibited in galleries throughout northern New Jersey.

My large-scale sculpture, The Essex Column, is on permanent exhibit at the              Wildflower Sculpture park in South Mountain Reservation. Another large piece won “First in Sculpture” at the JCC Juried Show in Whippany. 

One chronicler of the NY art scene has called my sculptures “beautifully simple and mysterious”, and recently commented, “There is something new under the sun!”